The Morgan Plus Four Super Sports Sports Car

A review of The Morgan Plus Four Super Sports Sports Car, covering development, important features, and technical data of this the fifth model in the Morgan range.

In this Article, I offer a nostalgic look at the Morgan Plus Four Super Sports, one of an elite group of classic cars, which was manufactured during the period 1936 to 1950.

The creation of the Morgan Plus Four Super Sports is, in essence, down to the skills of Chris Lawrence, whose Morgan Plus 4 was very successful in the 1959 UK Race Season.

In 1962, his competition successes came to the notice of Peter Morgan, who offered him Morgan works support.

As a result, he won his Class in the 1962 Le Mans 24 hour race.

Under the name Lawrencetune, he prepared engines for Morgan when specially ordered.

The Lawrencetune Morgan Super Sports used the aluminium low-line bodies prepared specially for Le Mans.

However, prior to low-line Super Sport production, a number of hybrid Plus 4′s were produced with the original steel high-line bodies, coupled with aluminium wings, and Lawrencetune engines.

These are now a highly sought after models.

During the period mid 1950′s to early 1960′s, the Morgan Plus 4 was powered by a series of Triumph TR engines and gearboxes.

In 1960, Morgan teamed up with Lawrencetune, who modified the engines of a small number of Plus 4′s which were entered into various endurance events, including the Le Mans.

Since it was not unusual for these modified cars to secure at least Class wins, they duly created interest amongst the sports car fraternity to encourage Morgan to produce equivalent modified Plus 4′s.

Hence the birth of the Plus 4 Super Sports.

In February 1961, Morgan launched the Super Sports which featured:

Specially modified 2138 cc, 4-cylinder Triumph TR2 engine developing 125 bhp at 5500 rpm
Four speed manual gearbox
Gas flowed head
Compression ratio of 9.0:1
Modified camshaft
Balanced crankshaft
Two twin choke Webber 42DCOE carburettors
Special inlet manifold
Four branch exhaust system using two pipes
An oil cooler
Four wheel disc brakes

The two seater Super Sports were produced in one of two body styles – either the high body or low body versions.

Early models made use of the high-line bodies from the Plus 4, whilst later models used the low-line bodies from the 4/4.

In 1962, a Lawrence tuned Plus 4 secured Morgan’s finest success at Le Mans, where it was a Class winner.

As a result, it became the prototype of the Super Sports, which featured a lighter, low-line aluminium body, and a more powerful 125 bhp engine derived from a modified 92 bhp TR2 unit.

These cars were distinctive with their bonnet scoop, which was necessary due to the cars’ two twin choke Webber carburettors.

During the period 1961 to 1968, a total of 104 Morgan Plus 4′s were modified to achieve the Super Sports specification.

Of these, 95 were two seaters built for racing and competitions primarily in the US.

Furthermore, 50 of these cars were built as convertibles.

With a top speed of nearly 120 mph, they were not only high performance cars, but also well suited to competitions.

A unique example of this car was known as the Baby Doll, and was famous in Morgan folklore.

It was specially ordered, in early 1962, by Lew Spencer, a Morgan dealer and noted SCCA (Sports Car Club of America) member.

This was his personal Morgan race car, in which he subsequently won the 1962 SCCA C Class National Championship.

The Baby Doll was renowned for the fact that it regularly beat Corvettes, Porsches, and E-Types, even though it sported a smaller engine than its competitors.

It has been suggested that the Plus Four Super Sports offered what was probably the best value performance car on the market at that time.

It had precise handling, with a body styling that took one back to the classic cars of the 1930′s.

The Super Sports is the most desirable Morgan performance car owing to its competition successes in a number of major international races, combined with its limited production.

This marked the end of the Morgan Plus Four Super Sports

Perhaps this stroll down memory lane might have answered, or at least shed light on, a possible question:

Which Morgan Sports Car is Your Favourite?

However, should this question still remain unanswered, I will be reviewing, in some detail, in future articles within this website, the entire range of Morgan sports cars which were featured in the memorable era spanning 1911 to 1996.

I hope you join me in my nostalgic travels “down sports car memory lane”.

The Morgan Four Four Sports Car

A review of The Morgan Four Four Sports Car, covering development, important features, and technical data of this the second model in the Morgan range.

In this Article, I offer a nostalgic look at the Morgan Four Four, one of an elite group of classic cars, which was manufactured during the period 1936 to 1950.

In 1936, Henry Morgan and his son visited Ford’s new factory in Dagenham.

Following the visit, he confirmed his intention that Morgan was to remain a small and flexible company, and would not follow the route of mass production.

He intended to follow in the footsteps of men like Donald Healey, who were car enthusiasts at heart, and whose philosophy was that of being product rather than process led.

By 1936, the Morgan Three Wheeler sports car had been in continuous production for 27 years, in which time some 30,000 units had been built.

However, the introduction of small, economical, mass produced cars spelt the death knell for the three wheeler.

The company’s answer was to design and build a completely new car which had four wheels, not three.

The new model was named the Morgan Four Four sports car.

The prototype was rigorously tested both in trials and on the track, and was finally launched at Motor Shows in both London and Paris.

The title “Four Four”, chosen to differentiate it from the previous three wheelers, confirmed it had four wheels, not three, and four cylinders, not two.

The car had a steel chassis with steel, later replaced by aluminium, body panels on an ash frame, which gave it the necessary strength and light weight required in a sports car.

The 4-4 was an immediate success.

The original two seater Morgan 4-4 convertible, launched in 1936, was the most sought after of the three variants.

Up to 1939, the car was powered by a 1122 cc Coventry Climax engine, developing 34 bhp.

Beyond this, it was replaced by the Special 1267 cc, overhead valve engine, developing 39 bhp, uniquely supplied by the Standard Motor Company.

Prior to 1938, it incorporated a four speed Meadows gearbox, which was then replaced by an equivalent Moss unit, fitted in the centre of the chassis, and connected to the back axle by a short prop shaft.

The car used 8 inch Girling drum brakes, activated by a rod and cable.

In 1937, the four seater variant was announced, also using the Coventry Climax engine.

Then, in 1938, and using the same chassis, the drophead coupe was launched.

This was an elegant touring car, with high doors, a distinctive windscreen, permanent window frames, and a small wooden panel at roof level which allowed the hood to be closed easily and effectively.

The early model was fitted with the Coventry Climax engine, which was later changed to the 1267 cc Special engine from the Standard Motor Company.

After WW2, all versions of the 4-4 were fitted with the Standard 1267 cc engine, and continued to be built until 1950, when succeeded by the larger Morgan Plus Four.

The 4-4 Series further reinforced Morgan’s reputation for quality, performance sports cars.

Morgans acquitted themselves well in road races, such as the RAC Rally, as well as the famous Tourist Trophy in which, in 1937, a Morgan 4-4 won on handicap.

Based on the 1937 winning 4-4, a new limited edition model, called the TT Replica, was showcased, with a distinctive sloping rear panel, and sporting a single spare wheel.

Another limited edition model, called the Le Mans Replica, was based on the 4-4 entered in the Le Mans 24 hour race of 1938 and 1939.

In 1937, a small number of modified cars were built for the race track, and featured 1098 cc Coventry Climax engines, with balanced crankshafts, developing 42 bhp.

In 1938, a works tuned Morgan 4-4, with a novice driver, was entered in the Le ans 24 hour race, and finished 13th overall.

The following year, the car finished 15th overall, and second in class at Le Mans.

Around this time, two noteworthy trials were undertaken:

A Ford V8 Pilot engine, developing 22 bhp, was fitted to a Morgan chassis, and produced an impressive performance
An Arnott supercharger, when fitted to a Morgan with a 1 litre engine, allowed it to reach 80 mph

In 1946, car production resumed but, following post WW2 shortages, the allocation of steel was on the basis of export production, rather than for the home market.

Accordingly, the company embarked on an intensive export drive for new markets.

As a result of steel shortages, post WW2 Morgan body panels were built entirely of aluminium.

In 1947, the Standard Motor Company introduced a new single engine policy whereby, after 1949, the special arrangement for the supply of the 1267 cc engine to Morgan would cease.

In 1949, a prototype of a new Morgan was unveiled, featuring a Standard Vanguard 2.1 litre engine which generated a much improved performance, when compared with the 4-4.

The new car was designated the Morgan Plus Four sports car, and was launched in 1950.

At the very first Goodwood Motor Racing Meeting in September 1948, Peter Morgan drove a Morgan in the 1100 cc class and finished in second position.

The company was particularly successful when its car were entered in motor races and hill climbs that were aimed specifically at unmodified production cars.

In 1954, a new company innovation, the cowled radiator, was introduced in order to take advantage of its additional aerodynamic features.

In the public relations arena, Morgan was at the forefront of securing the benefits derived from celebrity endorsements.

In fact, during the 1960′s, such notaries as Brigitte Bardot, David Bailey, and Ralph Lauren were all seen driving about town in a Morgan sports car.

Morgan had always concentrated on producing simple cars, with the intention of making them available to the widest possible market.

This marked the end of the Morgan Four Four

Perhaps this stroll down memory lane might have answered, or at least shed light on, a possible question:

Which Morgan Sports Car is Your Favourite?

However, should this question still remain unanswered, I will be reviewing, in some detail, in future articles within this website, the entire range of Morgan sports cars which were featured in the memorable era spanning 1911 to 1996.

I hope you join me in my nostalgic travels “down sports car memory lane”.

The Morgan Four Four Sports Car

A review of The Morgan Four Four Sports Car, covering development, important features, and technical data of this the second model in the Morgan range.

In this Article, I offer a nostalgic look at the Morgan Four Four, one of an elite group of classic cars, which was manufactured during the period 1936 to 1950.

In 1936, Henry Morgan and his son visited Ford’s new factory in Dagenham.

Following the visit, he confirmed his intention that Morgan was to remain a small and flexible company, and would not follow the route of mass production.

He intended to follow in the footsteps of men like Donald Healey, who were car enthusiasts at heart, and whose philosophy was that of being product rather than process led.

By 1936, the Morgan Three Wheeler sports car had been in continuous production for 27 years, in which time some 30,000 units had been built.

However, the introduction of small, economical, mass produced cars spelt the death knell for the three wheeler.

The company’s answer was to design and build a completely new car which had four wheels, not three.

The new model was named the Morgan Four Four sports car.

The prototype was rigorously tested both in trials and on the track, and was finally launched at Motor Shows in both London and Paris.

The title “Four Four”, chosen to differentiate it from the previous three wheelers, confirmed it had four wheels, not three, and four cylinders, not two.

The car had a steel chassis with steel, later replaced by aluminium, body panels on an ash frame, which gave it the necessary strength and light weight required in a sports car.

The 4-4 was an immediate success.

The original two seater Morgan 4-4 convertible, launched in 1936, was the most sought after of the three variants.

Up to 1939, the car was powered by a 1122 cc Coventry Climax engine, developing 34 bhp.

Beyond this, it was replaced by the Special 1267 cc, overhead valve engine, developing 39 bhp, uniquely supplied by the Standard Motor Company.

Prior to 1938, it incorporated a four speed Meadows gearbox, which was then replaced by an equivalent Moss unit, fitted in the centre of the chassis, and connected to the back axle by a short prop shaft.

The car used 8 inch Girling drum brakes, activated by a rod and cable.

In 1937, the four seater variant was announced, also using the Coventry Climax engine.

Then, in 1938, and using the same chassis, the drophead coupe was launched.

This was an elegant touring car, with high doors, a distinctive windscreen, permanent window frames, and a small wooden panel at roof level which allowed the hood to be closed easily and effectively.

The early model was fitted with the Coventry Climax engine, which was later changed to the 1267 cc Special engine from the Standard Motor Company.

After WW2, all versions of the 4-4 were fitted with the Standard 1267 cc engine, and continued to be built until 1950, when succeeded by the larger Morgan Plus Four.

The 4-4 Series further reinforced Morgan’s reputation for quality, performance sports cars.

Morgans acquitted themselves well in road races, such as the RAC Rally, as well as the famous Tourist Trophy in which, in 1937, a Morgan 4-4 won on handicap.

Based on the 1937 winning 4-4, a new limited edition model, called the TT Replica, was showcased, with a distinctive sloping rear panel, and sporting a single spare wheel.

Another limited edition model, called the Le Mans Replica, was based on the 4-4 entered in the Le Mans 24 hour race of 1938 and 1939.

In 1937, a small number of modified cars were built for the race track, and featured 1098 cc Coventry Climax engines, with balanced crankshafts, developing 42 bhp.

In 1938, a works tuned Morgan 4-4, with a novice driver, was entered in the Le ans 24 hour race, and finished 13th overall.

The following year, the car finished 15th overall, and second in class at Le Mans.

Around this time, two noteworthy trials were undertaken:

A Ford V8 Pilot engine, developing 22 bhp, was fitted to a Morgan chassis, and produced an impressive performance
An Arnott supercharger, when fitted to a Morgan with a 1 litre engine, allowed it to reach 80 mph

In 1946, car production resumed but, following post WW2 shortages, the allocation of steel was on the basis of export production, rather than for the home market.

Accordingly, the company embarked on an intensive export drive for new markets.

As a result of steel shortages, post WW2 Morgan body panels were built entirely of aluminium.

In 1947, the Standard Motor Company introduced a new single engine policy whereby, after 1949, the special arrangement for the supply of the 1267 cc engine to Morgan would cease.

In 1949, a prototype of a new Morgan was unveiled, featuring a Standard Vanguard 2.1 litre engine which generated a much improved performance, when compared with the 4-4.

The new car was designated the Morgan Plus Four sports car, and was launched in 1950.

At the very first Goodwood Motor Racing Meeting in September 1948, Peter Morgan drove a Morgan in the 1100 cc class and finished in second position.

The company was particularly successful when its car were entered in motor races and hill climbs that were aimed specifically at unmodified production cars.

In 1954, a new company innovation, the cowled radiator, was introduced in order to take advantage of its additional aerodynamic features.

In the public relations arena, Morgan was at the forefront of securing the benefits derived from celebrity endorsements.

In fact, during the 1960′s, such notaries as Brigitte Bardot, David Bailey, and Ralph Lauren were all seen driving about town in a Morgan sports car.

Morgan had always concentrated on producing simple cars, with the intention of making them available to the widest possible market.

This marked the end of the Morgan Four Four

Perhaps this stroll down memory lane might have answered, or at least shed light on, a possible question:

Which Morgan Sports Car is Your Favourite?

However, should this question still remain unanswered, I will be reviewing, in some detail, in future articles within this website, the entire range of Morgan sports cars which were featured in the memorable era spanning 1911 to 1996.

I hope you join me in my nostalgic travels “down sports car memory lane”.

The Porsche Sports Car

A review of The Porsche Sports Car, covering development, important features, and technical data of each model in the range, from the 356 to the 993 Turbo S.

In this Article, I offer a nostalgic look at the Porsche Sports Car, one of an elite group of classic cars, which was manufactured during the period 1948 to 1995.

Ferdinand Porsche would have to wait until after WW2 to fulfil his dream of creating a sports car from the Volkswagen Beetle.

1949

In 1949, the 356 was the first Porsche sports car, and was debuted at the Geneva Motor Show where it created immediate interest.

Owners of the 356 were keen to race the car as well as drive it on the streets. As a result, orders reached some 10,000 units by 1964. When production of the Porsche 356 ended in 1965, 76,313 cars had been built.

1964

In 1964, the 911 Porsche sports car made it debut. It was a 2+2, with an air cooled, rear mounted, 2 litre, 6-cylinder, 130 bhp engine.

1966

In 1966, the more powerful Porsche 911S was launched with a 160 bhp engine.

1969

In 1969, fuel injection was added to the 911S, and the 911E became the new middle of the range model.

1970

In 1970, the engine capacity of all 911′s was increased to 2195 cc.

1972

In 1972, all models received a larger 2341 cc engine. This was known as the “2.4L” engine. The 911S was the top of the range.

1973

In 1973, the next car to be introduced was the 911 Carrera 2.7 RS. It had stiffened suspension and a distinctive rear spoiler.

Carrera was Spanish for “race”, and the RS meant “racing sports”.

1974

In 1974, the 911 Carrera 3.0 RS appeared, with Bosch fuel injection and a 230 bhp engine.

It was designed with racing in mind, and had a number of successes.

In 1974, the 911 Turbo was introduced. The engine was a turbocharged 3 litre, 260 bhp unit.

Known as the Type 930, it had distinctive wide wheel arches and a large rear spoiler.

1976

In 1976, the Carrera 3.0 was introduced. It used the 930, 3 litre, Turbo engine with Bosch fuel injection, but without the turbocharger.

1978

By 1978, the engine of the 930 Turbo had increased to 3.3 litres.

In that year, the latest Porsche sports car to be introduced was the 3 litre, 911SC. In essence, this was a Carrera 3.0 with a detuned engine.

1980

In 1980, the power of the 911SC was increased to 188 bhp which, by 1983, was further increased to 204 bhp in non US models.

1982

In 1982, Porsche introduced the first 911 Cabriolet, the last such model being seen on the 356 in the 60′s.

Its success meant that a Cabriolet would be offered in the future.

1984

In 1984, the 911SC was replaced by the 911 3.2 Carrera Porsche sports car. The higher compression engine developed 231 bhp in non US markets.

All Carrera models were offered as a fixed head coupe, cabriolet and targa (with removable hard top) versions.

This was, in effect, the last version of the original 911 series.

Also, that year, Porsche introduced the Supersport, which had a striking resemblance to the 930 Turbo, with wide wheel arches and the distinctive rear spoiler.

1989

In 1989, the 911 Speedster was launched, which was a low roof version of the Cabriolet. It was available as a narrow bodied version, or in the style of the Supersport.

Also that year, the 911 Type 964 series made it debut.

It was introduced as the 911 Carrera, 4 Porsche sports car, with a 3.6 litre engine. A rear spoiler was activated at high speed. The “4″ signified four wheel drive.

1990

In 1990, the Carrera 2 was launched, with drive on the rear wheels only.

The 930 Turbo experienced unprecedented demand in the late 1980′s.

In 1990, the Type 930 was replaced by the Type 964 Turbo, Porsche sports car, with a 3.3 litre, turbocharged engine.

1992

In 1992, the 3.3 litre 964 Turbo S was launched, with lowered suspension, and designed for performance.

In 1992, the 964 3.8 Carrera RS, Porsche sports car, was launched.

It had the Turbo Style body, similar to the Supersport, a 3.8 litre engine, and a large fixed rear spoiler in place of the moveable one from the Carrera 2 and 4.

1993

In 1993, the 3.6 litre 964 Turbo, Porsche sports car, producing 360 bhp, was introduced to complement other 964 models.

A year later, a limited edition 964 3.6 Turbo S appeared, available with the classic Porsche body style, or with the exclusive Slant nose option.

1994

In 1994, the Type 993 was introduced, and represented the final series of air cooled 911′s, originally appearing in 1964.

The revised body styling was smoother, with a more aerodynamic front end, and a new rear.

The engine remained at 3.6 litres, but power increaseed to 272 bhp. In 1996, it was further increased to 286 bhp.

The Carrera 4 and 2 versions were available, the latter being simply called Carrera.

A rear wheel drive 993 3.8 RS, Porsche sports car, was introduced, with a 3.8 litre engine, developing 300 bhp.

1995

In 1995, the 993 3.6 Turbo, Porsche sports car, was launched.

It was the first of the Porsche cars to be fitted with twin turbochargers, which produced 408 bhp from the 3.6 litre engine.

1997

In 1997, the 993 3.6 Turbo S was launched, developing 424 bhp.

This represented the last air cooled 911 Turbo.

1998

In 1998, the Type 996 was introduced, in which the air cooled 911 was replaced with a water cooled version.

The body styling of all previous 911′s was based on the original 1963 version. However, the 996 incorporated a redesigned body shell.

The 996 911 formed the basis of a whole series of variants, such as the Carrera 4 and “Turbo Look” Carrera 4S, the racing orientated GT3, and the 996 Turbo.

This marked the end of the classic Porsche sports car.

Beyond 2000, Porsche produced a number of exciting sports cars which, sadly, falls beyond the time frame of this review.

Perhaps this stroll down memory lane might have answered, or at least shed light on, a possible question:

“Which Porsche Sports Car Is Your Favourite?”

However, should this question still remain unanswered, I will be reviewing, in some detail, in future articles within this website, the entire range of Porsche sports cars which were featured in the memorable era spanning 1948 to 1995.

I hope you join me in my nostalgic travels “down sports car memory lane”.

The British Sports Car

A review of The British Sports Car, covering development, features and technical data of each chosen model, from the Mini Cooper S, Jensen Healey, Daimler Dart, to the McLaren F1.

In this Article, I offer a nostalgic look at British Sports Cars, an excellent example of a collection of some true classics, which were manufactured during the period 1959 to 1996.

Mini Cooper

John Cooper, who built Formula One and rally cars, was well aware of the tuning potential of the A-Series engine used in the Mini.

After extensive discussion and collaboration, the Austin and Morris Mini Cooper sports car made their appearance in 1961.

The Morris Mini used an 848 cc engine. However, with tuning, and giving it a longer stroke, the capacity could be increased to 997 cc. Power would increase from 34 bhp to 55 bhp.

The Mark 1 Mini Cooper had two SU carburettors, a close ratio gearbox, and front wheel disc brakes.

In 1964, the original 997 cc engine was replaced, in the Mark 2 Mini Cooper, with one using a shorter stoke and a capacity of 998 cc.

In 1992, the Rover Mini Cooper used a 1275 cc engine, with fuel injection replacing the SU’s.

Sales of the Mini Cooper were: 64,000 Mark 1 and 16,000 Mark 2.

Mini Cooper S

In 1963, more powerful versions of the basic Mini Cooper sports car were debuted under the name of Austin and Morris.

The first was the 1071 cc Mini Cooper S, with a modified crankshaft and stiffened main bearings, to allow for further tuning.

It had enlarged servo assisted disc brakes, and was designated the Mark 1 Mini Cooper S. It was built for only one year.

In 1964, the 970 cc Mini Cooper S was launched, designed for racing in the under 1000 cc class.

However, it was not popular, and was only manufactured for a year. It was designate the Mark 2 Mini Cooper S

On the other hand, in 1963, the 1275 cc Mini Cooper S was introduced, and was an immediate success, with continuous production until 1971.

There was a Mark 1, 2 and 3 version. This model was designed for racing in the under 1300 cc class

Sales of the Mini Cooper S were:

19,000 Mark 1 (combined 970, 1071 and 1275)
6,300 Mark 2 (1275 only)
1,570 Mark 3 (1275 only)

A Mini Cooper S won the Monte Carlo Rally in 1964, 1965 and 1967.

Jensen Healey

When production of the Austin Healey 3000 sports car ended in 1967, there were discussions between Donald Healey and the carmaker Jensen.

From the resultant collaboration was born the Jensen Healey sports car.

At the prototype stage, a number of engines were evaluated from Vauxhall, BMW and Ford. However, none were acceptable.

Finally, Jensen approached Lotus who had a new, but untested engine which met the requirements.

It was a 2-litre, twin overhead cam, 16 valve, aluminium unit called the Lotus 907.

The result was offered as a two seater convertible or coupe, with front disc brakes and rear drums. It used coil springs at the front, and a rear live axle.

European export models had two, twin choke carburettors, whilst US models had a single Stromberg, for emission requirements.

The Jensen Healey was popular in the US, but less so in the UK. A total of 3,777 were sold.

To offset financial difficulties, the Jensen Healey GT was introduced in 1975. It was a 2+2 coupe with a limited rear view.

Jensen went into receivership in 1976.

Jensen Interceptor

In 1966, the Jensen Interceptor sports car was launched.

It was offered as a two door, four seat hatchback, convertible or coupe.

The Mark 1 version used a 6.3 litre (383 cu in) Chrysler V8 engine, developing 325 bhp.

It had a distinctive, very large, wrap around rear window that also acted as a tailgate. It had disc brakes on all wheels, independent front suspension, and rear leaf springs.

In 1969, the Mark 2 was introduced with styling that was slightly revised.

In 1971, a larger Chrysler 7.2 litre (440 cu in) V8 engine was used with three, twin choke carburettors, developing 330 bhp.

This version of fuel delivery was called the SP, and was also available on the 6.3 litre engine, developing 385 bhp.

In 1972, the 7.2 litre engine now used a single 4-barrel carburettor.

In 1973, the Mark 3 had further minor styling changes.

Daimler Dart

By the late 1950′s, the luxury carmaker Daimler was in financial difficulties.

As a result, the company decided to enter the US sports market with their own model.

Hence, the Daimler Dart, later known as the Daimler SP250, was born. The “SP” referred to Sports, and the “250″ to its 2.5 litre engine.

Launched at the New York Auto Show in 1959, it was well received.

It was described as a 2+2 sports car, with a fibreglass body on a steel chassis.

Its engine was an all new 2.5 litre, hemispheric combustion chambered, overhead valve, V8 unit, with two SU carburettors.

The chassis in the original A-spec sports car had a tendency to flex on hard cornering, causing the doors to open.

However, this was rectified in 1960 with the introduction of the B-spec car.

In 1963, the C-spec version appeared, with luxurious extras as standard.

Daimler was acquired by jaguar in 1960 and, sadly, since the Dart had to compete with the E-Type, it wan’t given the attention it deserved, which had an adverse affect on sales.

Mc Laren F1

In 1988, a simple drawing of a three seater sports car formed the basis for creating the ultimate sports car. Hence was born the F1.

In 1992, the McLaren F1 was presented at The Sporting Club in Monaco.

It used a glass fibre monocoque chassis.

It was decided that the engine should be normally aspirated since turbochargers and superchargers added a degree of complexity which might affect the drivers’ level of engine control .

The final choice of engine was a BMW 6.1 litre, V12. It used an aluminium block and cylinder head, four overhead camshafts, and variable valve timing.

The road version had a compression ratio of 11.1.

In 1998, the McLaren F1 was the world’s fastest road car, reaching 231 mph, with its revs limited, and 243 mph when able to rev freely.

Only 106 F1′s were manufactured:

64 of the standard street version (F1)
5 were tuned versions (LM’s), referring to Le Mans
3 were road cars (GT)
5 were prototypes (XP)
28 were race cars (GTR)
1 was an LM prototype

This marked the end of my review of the British sports car.

Perhaps this stroll down memory lane might have answered, or at least shed light on, a possible question:

Which British Sports Car is Your Favourite

However, should this question still remain unanswered, I will be reviewing, in some detail, in future articles within this website, this range of British sports cars which were featured in the memorable era spanning 1959 to 1986.

I hope you join me in my nostalgic travels “down sports car memory lane”.